Blog Archives

Peak warbler has happened!

The tropical push kept going on May 13 when migrant waves washed upon the shores of Georgian Bay at Cabot Head: it was another successful day of banding and observing. A total of 74 species were counted, including 18 species

Posted in STATION NOTES / BLOG

A gallery

From top left, clockwise: An adult male Scarlet Tanager; A young female Pileated Woodpecker; A “Gambell” White-crowned Sparrow (a sub-species from the West); an adult male Blackburnian Warbler. A few of the wonderful birds who come through and are “lucky”

Posted in STATION NOTES / BLOG

The Tropics have arrived!

What a difference a week makes! The horizon now shimmers with fresh green leaves, a tentative warmth seeps into our cold bones, a Tree Swallow pair has adopted the newly installed nest box. And colourful, tropical-looking birds are arriving in

Posted in STATION NOTES / BLOG

The many moods of Cabot Head!

Pictures: St├ęphane Menu

Posted in STATION NOTES / BLOG

It’s a hoot!

On May 3, after a long afternoon walking the Bruce Trail in the Bruce Peninsula National Park, the international BPBO team drove back to the station buoyed by a full sunny day. Arriving near the gate, where the landscape opens

Posted in STATION NOTES / BLOG

Let’s talk about the weather!

On our third day of continuous rain (May 2), I believe that a post on the weather is in order. As you probably know, when it rains, there is no banding, as it would be too dangerous for the birds.

Posted in STATION NOTES / BLOG

The surprise of Spring

As I am very fond of saying, always expect the unexpected with birds and bird migration! Birds, untethered to land or sea, trace invisible pathways through the air, connecting distant locales with their feathery wings. And sometimes they go astray

Posted in STATION NOTES / BLOG

Spring migration monitoring has begun at Cabot Head!

As inexorably as the Earth spins around the Sun, another season has begun at Cabot Head: the 16th consecutive spring that BPBO will be monitoring the spring bird migration. This year, in marked contrast with 2016, there was no snow,

Posted in STATION NOTES / BLOG

A final tally!

Three weeks have now passed since the nets were taken down and stored away at Cabot Head. Winter is in the process of slowly arriving. I have been busy with data analysis and report writing. As (more or less) promised,

Posted in STATION NOTES / BLOG

A very stormy end of season

The fall migration monitoring of 2016 has now officially ended, with the last day being on October 31. It is always a bittersweet moment to furl the nets for the last time and store them away for the winter. It

Posted in STATION NOTES / BLOG
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