Yearly Archives: 2019

Warblers in October!

Warblers in October- October 12, 2019 It has been a very pleasant beginning of October, with mild temperatures and sunny skies, with more and more leaves changing colour. The sudden drop in temperatures on the overcast morning of the 12th

Posted in STATION NOTES / BLOG

Change is the only constant!

On the first day of October, a very warm and very strong wind is blowing from the South, bringing unseasonably warm temperatures and keeping our nets furled. How often do I have to write “unseasonal” when it comes to weather

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Birding as meditation.

For this week’s blog, several titles came to mind: “the return of Summer”, because temperatures have soared back to unexpected and unseasonal warmth; or, “a time of transition”, as new species have started to arrive. According to the American Birding

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A Week of Storms.

A week of Storms… In the nine days from September 8th to 16th, four banding days were lost to strong wind and/or rain. The wind came almost from all points of the compass, striking us from the North, South, East,

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Hints of change.

In the North wind and colder nights, in the reddening of leaves and shortening of days, in the first honking skeins of southbound geese, changes are under way. We’re slowly transitioning from care-free summer to dutiful autumn, as any school

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Where have all the birds gone?

And so, it continues to be slow, in the sky, in the trees, and in the nets. There are certainly multiple reasons for such paucity but I do not want dare advance explanations which would be no more than barely

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A slow movement of feathers

It has been now ten days of monitoring. We’ve been settling into a routine of waking up before dawn, admiring the slow rise of the sun over Georgian Bay, listening to the sounds of birds, trees, and water. Summer is

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A new season begins

It is mid-August, leaving the dog days of summer behind and slowly-but-surely returning to cooler temperatures, longer nights, and migrating birds. It is also when monitoring starts again at the Cabot Head Research Station, with all 15 nets set up

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End of season

Fittingly, on this last day of the spring migration monitoring, June 10th, it is pouring rain! It has been a wet spring for sure: there were 16 days (including today) with precipitation in the 57 days of monitoring, or 28%

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Happy, happy, happy!

On May 29th, 2019, history was made at the Cabot Head Research Station when we banded our first ever Eastern Bluebirds! Yes, bluebirds, plural. We captured one adult male and one adult female in the same net at the same

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